The Story Bin
The Story Bin
The Wise Woman's Stone

A wise woman who was traveling in the mountains found a precious stone in a stream. The next day she met another traveler who was hungry and the wise woman opened her bag to share her food. The hungry traveler saw the precious stone and asked the woman to give it to him.
 
She did so without hesitation. The traveler left rejoicing in his good fortune. He knew the stone was worth enough to give him security for a lifetime.
 
But, a few days later, he came back to return the stone to the wise woman. "I've been thinking," he said. "I know how valuable this stone is, but I give it back in the hope that you can give me something even more precious.
 
Give me what you have within you that enabled you to give me this stone." 
 
The Treasure

The cheerful girl with bouncy golden curls was almost five. Waiting with her mother at the checkout stand, she saw them: a circle of glistening white pearls in a pink foil box.
 
"Oh please, Mommy. Can I have them? Please, Mommy, please!" Quickly the mother checked the back of the little foil box and then looked back into the pleading blue eyes of her little girl's upturned face.
 
"A dollar ninety-five. That's almost $2.00 If you really want them, I'll think of some extra chores for you and in no time you can save enough money to buy them for yourself. Your birthday's only a week away and you might get another crisp dollar bill from Grandma."
 
As soon as Jenny got home, she emptied her penny bank and counted out 17 pennies. After dinner, she did more than her share of chores and she went to the neighbor and asked Mrs. McJames if she could pick dandelions for ten cents. On her birthday, Grandma did give her another new dollar bill and at last she had enough money to buy the necklace.
 
Jenny loved her pearls. They made her feel dressed up and grown up. She wore them everywhere-Sunday school, kindergarten, even to bed. The only time she took them off was when she went swimming or had a bubble bath. Mother said if she got them wet, they would make her neck turn green.
 
Jenny had a very loving daddy and every night when she was ready for bed, he would stop whatever he was doing and come upstairs to read her a story. One night when he finished the story, he asked Jenny, "Do you love me?"
 
"Oh yes, Daddy. You know that I love you."
 
"Then give me your pearls."
 
"Oh, Daddy, not my pearls. But you can have Princess-the white horse from my collection. The one with the pink tail. Remember, Daddy? The one you gave me. She's my favorite."
 
"That's okay, Honey. Daddy loves you. Good night." And he brushed her cheek with a kiss.
 
About a week later, after the story time, Jenny's daddy asked again, "Do you love me?"
 
"Daddy, you know I love you."
 
"Then give me your pearls."
 
"Oh Daddy, not my pearls. But you can have my baby doll. The brand new one I got for my birthday. She is so beautiful and you can have the yellow blanket that matches her sleeper."
 
"That's okay. Sleep well. God bless you, little one. Daddy loves you." And as always, he brushed her cheek with a gentle kiss.
 
A few nights later when her daddy came in, Jenny was sitting on her bed with her legs crossed Indian-style. As he came close, he noticed her chin was trembling and one silent tear rolled down her cheek.
 
"What is it, Jenny? What's the matter?"
 
Jenny didn't say anything but lifted her little hand up to her daddy And when she opened it, there was her little pearl necklace. With a little quiver, she finally said, "Here, Daddy. It's for you."
 
With tears gathering in his own eyes, Jenny's kind daddy reached out with one hand to take the dime-store necklace, and with the other hand he reached into his pocket and pulled out a blue velvet case with a strand of genuine pearls and gave them to Jenny. He had had them all the time. He was just waiting for her to give up the dime-store stuff so he could give her genuine treasure...
 
Sandcastles

Hot sun. Salty air. Rhythmic waves. A little boy is on the beach. On his knees he scoops and packs the sand with plastic shovels into a bright red bucket. Then he upends the bucket on the surface and lifts it. And, to the delight of the little architect, a castle tower is created.
 
All afternoon he will work. Spooning out the moat. Packing the walls. Bottle tops will be sentries. Popsicle stix will be bridges. A sandcastle will be built.
 
Big city. Busy streets. Rumbling traffic.
 
A man is in his office. At his desk he shuffles papers into stacks and delegates assignments. He cradles the phone on his shoulder and punches the keyboard with his fingers. Numbers are juggled and contracts are signed and much to the delight of the man, a profit is made.
 
All his life he will work. Formulating the plans. Forecasting the future. Annuities will be sentries. Capital gains will be bridges. An empire will be built.
 
Two builders of two castles. They have much in common. They shape granules into grandeurs. They see nothing and make something. They are diligent and determined. And for both the tide will rise and the end will come.
 
Yet that is where the similarities cease. For the boy sees the end while the man ignores it. Watch the boy as the dusk approaches.
 
As the waves near, the wise child jumps to his feet and begins to clap. There is no sorrow. No fear. No regret. He knew this would happen. He is not surprised. And when the great breaker crashes into his castle and his masterpiece is sucked into the sea, he smiles. He smiles, picks up his tools, takes his father's hand, and goes home.
 
The grownup, however, is not so wise. As the wave of years collapses on his castle he is terrified. He hovers over the sandy monument to protect it. He blocks the waves from the walls he has made. Salt-water soaked and shivering he snarls at the incoming tide.
 
"It's my castle," he defies.
 
The ocean need not respond. Both know to whom the sand belongs...
 
How Long?

A young but earnest student approached his teacher, and asked the Master:
 
"If I work very hard and diligent, how long will it take for me to get where I want to be?"
 
The Master thought about this, then replied, "Ten years."
 
The student then said, "But what if I work very, very hard and really apply myself to learn fast -- How long then ?"
 
Replied the Master, "Well, twenty years."
 
"But, if I really, really work at it. How long then ?" asked the student.
 
"Thirty years," replied the Master.
 
"But, I do not understand," said the disappointed student. "At each time that I say I will work harder, you say it will take me longer. Why do you say that ?"
 
Replied the Master," You are watching the time. Keep one eye on the goal and the other on the path."
 
I Can Sleep When The Wind Blows

A young man applied for a job as a farmhand. When the farmer asked for his qualifications, he said, "I can sleep when the wind blows."
 
This puzzled the farmer. But he liked the young man, and hired him.
 
A few days later, the farmer and his wife were awakened in the night by a violent storm. They quickly began to check things out to see if all was secure. They found that the shutters of the farmhouse had been securely fastened. A good supply of logs had been set next to the fireplace.
 
The young man slept soundly.
 
The farmer and his wife then inspected their property. They found that the farm tools had been placed in the storage shed, safe from the elements.
 
The tractor had been moved into the garage. The barn was properly locked. Even the animals were calm. All was well.
 
The farmer then understood the meaning of the young man's words, "I can sleep when the wind blows."
 
 
 
 
Have a great day!
 
 
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